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'm bill hemmer. welcome back, alisyn. alisyn: i'mal lynn cam rata in for martha. >> northern japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake. i feel deep in my heart as i see the conditions in the affected area. i'm concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. with the help of those involved i hope things will not get worse. bill report emperor is in his as it and he's rarely seen on television. show you where we are right now. northeast of tokyo, 200 miles, the fukushima plant in an animation we put together to show you what's happening on the inside as it runs north to the south. you will see the four reactors at this plants in question. there were 6 reactors under consideration but for sake of this purpose we'll show you reactor number 1, 3, and 4. 1, 2, 3 were online when the quake and same rolled through. number 4 was offline. about it was rolling with spent nuclear fuel. then we can show you where we are today. that's what they looked like 7 days ago. on this map here, this was taken two days ago. the four reactors are on the screen. this is number 4, and num
>>> right now on "andrea mitchell reports," president obama promising full support to japan as it tries to avert nuclear disaster and cope with the unfolding humanitarian crisis in wake of friday's deadly quake. this hour, can a nuclear meltdown be avoided? engineers are more troubled today than ever about that crippled nuclear react or. we talk with congressman ed markey sounding the alarm for stricter safeguards. >>> experts say the big one is coming to california. are the officials there ready. >>> in libya gadhafi forces expand strikes against rebels on the front. secretary of state hillary clinton arrives in paris to talk with european counterparts about imposing a no-fly zone. >>> labor fight. is the challenge over bargaining rights about to head to court? >>> i'm norah o'donnell live in washington. andrea is on assignment. we begin in japan where the humanitarian disaster is compounded by the potential for a nuclear nightmare. 250,000 doses of iodine are being distributed to evacuees as a defense to radiation. it follows explosions at two nuclear reactors, a third is
unbelievable stories of survival. those are coming out of japan. we'll share them with you. >>> plus, what do you do if you share the house speaker's trademarked orange glow? if you're like this guy, you become a john boehner impersonator and hope you can learn to cry on cue. more coming up later. >>> first, we want to get to the news live at 5:30 a.m. here at 30 rock in new york city. just four days after suffering its most devastating natural disaster ever, japan is now potentially facing the worst nuclear accident since chernobyl. in total, there are 17 nuclear power plants across that country. this crisis largely centers around one complex. it's about 170 miles northeast of tokyo. the crippled fukushima power plant. high levels of radiation leaked from the facility this morning after a third reactor was rocked by an explosion and a fourth caught fire. in a brief address to that nation today, the country's prime minister urged calm but said there was a "very high risk of further leakage." after an emergency cabinet meeting, the japanese cabinet warned 140,000 people living within roughly 1
retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality.
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
and frayed nerves. the latest from japan. how is the radiation in that country now different from what you absorb every day? and they put the squeeze on pro-democracy demonstrators and a look at where the obama administration stands. live from the studio in washington. this is "special report." i'm bret baier. the news from japan continues to be mostly bad. but there was a positive note today, as the owner of the crippled nuclear plant says the new power line is almost done that will enable the restart of electric powered pumps and possibly a solution to the overheating crisis. elevated radiation levels have been detected outside the 20-mile emergency perimeter. the head of the u.s. nuclear agency says there is no more water in the spent fuel pool at the reactor plant. greg palkot is live in teak owe where it's just -- tokyo where it's just after 7:00 in the morning. good morning, greg. what does this mean? >> hey, bret. it's actually pretty serious. in fact, one of the worst case scenarios that have been bandied about. if true, the rods could get hotter and hotter and meltdown and shower
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
concerns about drinking water in japan. the government warning radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant has made tap water unsafe for babies. the u.s. air force bringing in more supplies to help with recovery operations there. >> the military is -- we are here to try and help people. this is a national disaster. we are here to work with the japanese people to start reconstruction and get sendai and other parts of japan's feet on the ground again. bill: the american relief effort includes 13,000 personnel, 20 ships and 140 aircraft. k.t. macfarland said the u.s. military is the first responders to the world. we found that in japan. heather: in the state of nevada, it has the largest share of illegal workers in the country. it also has the highest unemployment rate at 14%. are the illegals making a bad situation worse? anita vogel is joining us from los angeles. tell us about this new report. >> reporter: good morning. it lists the top states with the highest share of illegal immigrants in the labor pool. you mentioned nevada was the number one state with a 10% share of illegal immi
to the latest headlines out of japan, a measuring station in california has picked up radiation read innings the southern part of the state. a diplomat with access to the numbers says they are about a billion times beneath levels considered harmful to humans. and meantime, the crisis at the fukushima plant is getting worse. japanese authorities raise the accident rating from a 4 to a 5 after finding evidence of a partial meltdown in three of the reactor. a level 5 is the same classification as three mile island. japan's prime minister is asking the nation to come together to rebuild devastated areas. authorities say the number of confirmed dead is more than 6,900 and more than 10,000 people are missing. joining me now to talk about the latest developments in the nuclear crisis is arjoun makisani. arnie gunderson was an expert into the investigation of the three mile island accident. arnie, i'll start with you, now that we have this classification that puts japan at the same level as three mile island. >> this in my opinion is already worse than three mile island and should be a 6 instead of
ravaged nuclear plant in japan. earlier, workers at that site reported a massive spike in radioactive water in the cooling system. perhaps ten million times as higher than normal, but now plant operators conceding that extremely high reading was wrong. let's go to dominic streaming live from osaka, japan. >> reporter: gregg, they are having extreme problems with highly radioactive water at the four of six troubled reactors. this radioactive water has seeped into buildings around the reactors which is making the job more difficult. up until yesterday, which was sunday japan time for a monday morning, they were actually able to access certain parts and get close to the core as possible to. radioactive water spread to other parts. because workers can only go in for 15 minutes due to the health and safety levels it's making the job doubly difficult. they are not sure where the source has come from. is it the result of the water being sprayed in and actually diluted a lot of the other radioactive water? is it coming from somewhere? they don't know. until they can actually start to drain so
of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard if people like michele bauchmann, sarah palin, and donald trump suck up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in benghazi after a heralding couple of days. what happened today on the ground in libya that you've seen? >> reporter: tdaye went out of benghazi and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajd
't the case. after the break, the latest on the nuclear fall-out in japan. host: could switching to geico really save you 15% or more on car insurance? host: do dogs chase cats? ♪ 70's era music sfx: tires squealing ♪ 70's era music sfx: tires squealing vo: geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. >> bret: u.s. says contained structure at three rekors at the nuclear plant are intact. greg palkot is in osaka japan, with the latest. hello. >> reporter: that is good news from the nuclear regulatory commission in the united states and they say the situation is on the "verge of stabilizing," but there are set-backs. plumes of smoke on monday coming from two reactors. evacuation of workers, pickup in radiation. that appears to have dissipated. also electricity is hooked up to the reactors but what was feared is being found. machinery inside is damaged. the parts are going to be needed before any cooling pumps are started up. [ inaudible ] the government says there is no danger but they are looking further. traces found in tap water or elsewhere, the radiation fears are
in the show. again, she is dead at the age of 79. >>> want to turn now to the latest from japan, where a spike in radiation levels in tokyo's water supply has residents there on edge. we're joined by nbc news' chief science correspondent in tokyo, robert bazell. good to see you. we know the usda has put a hold on japanese imports into the u.s. on the wake of the radiation news. what are the big concerns there? >> reporter: well, here, willie, the concern is the water supply. there's a lot of concerns, of course, but the immediate concern in tokyo is the water supply as you mentioned. you can see here it's raining. and it's been raining heavily for days now, and what that rain does is it takes whatever's being released from the plant, the crippled nuclear plant, north of here, and drives it into the ground which drives it into the ground water. what happened today was the officials at the main water purification plant here discovered that radioactive iodine levels were twice as high as they should be for infants. they are still in the range considered safe for adults, but they advised parents t
nuclear power plant in japan where workers still desperately trying to prevent more radiation from seeping into the atmosphere. today officials report three work rz were exposed to radioactivity. two were sent to the hospital for treatment. meanwhile, workers distributing bottled water across tokyo after residents there cleared store shelves following yesterday's warning the city's tap water contained elevated radiation. japanese government also estimates this month's earthquake and tsunami could cost up to $309 billion in damage, which would make it the world's most expensive natural disaster ever. >>> this a-s a wild story. the national transportation safety board is now reviewing staffing at airports across the country after two passenger planes landed at reagan national airport yesterday without clearance because, according to aviation officials the air traffic controller fell asleep at reagan national airport in washington, d.c. the planes were carrying a total of 165 passengers and crew between them did land safely but they had to do it on their own after pilots took matters into the
weapon systems, perhaps a quicker drawdown, why are we still in europe? and other overseas miss. japan we allow them to -- we provide their military shield. it's time for some of these other countries to grow up. >> peter, you have a very positive statement, and i agree, but in that same bill, i think it was and we got about 120 people to vote for it. we're still building bridges in afghanistan, but i agree with you. >> i was with you on that vote. i want to build infrastructure they're in the united states. >> i love this love coming out on this program. >> when we look at defense, it's historically been the republican party blocked anything in that direction. they said i can't believe the democrats would do that, attention, how do you get beyond that? look at what our president is doing. he had a very strong statement about our need to be involve in libya. he expanded the war in afghanistan. oy 'bama is getting close to the possible. i think it's bipartisan. it's a bipartisan mess, and i think that republicans a lot of republicans and democrats outside of washington still expect a lot f
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15